Posts Tagged ‘business’

Impressing the masses with my knowledge of Ctrl+Tilde

Wednesday, February 13th, 2008

Last night was the first night of my new NYU enrichment class, Financial Analysis in VBA. What a dorky joy this is. We began with what the teacher called “basic advanced Excel” - functions that are generally limited to experienced Excel users and that are central elements to VBA programming but that are still standard in Excel (things like named ranges, text manipulation, auditing, and lookup tables). In two weeks, we’ll expand on this and get into the hardcore VBA world, which I’m very excited about.

I earned my Excel wonk street cred my showing off my knowledge of the keyboard shortcut for the formula auditing toolbar (thanks Ctrl+tilde!) and then showed that I know how to kick it old school by starting my cells with a + instead of an = because it’s more efficient for data entry cells, even if it is a nod to the days of Lotus 1-2-3. Good times.

It’s interesting for me to be learning technical skills in a classroom environment. I live my life online and everything I’ve ever done with technology has been self-taught. I’ll try to keep this updated with my feelings about how the weekly class experience is throughout the semester.

Of Food and Finance

Wednesday, June 20th, 2007

Source: Flickr

I’m giving a lecture at the Fancy Food Show in July called “Financing your Food Business” as part of an education session on Best Financial Practices for Specialty Food Manufacturers. The lecture should be fun, but I’m most excited for the opportunity to sample all the goods on the floor. Since I’m a picky eater, my dad pointed out that all I eat is specialty food. Plain chicken with brown rice qualifies as specialty, right?

skip lines, piss off crowds

Thursday, February 22nd, 2007

Source: FlyClear.com via Thrillist.

I just read about a company called Clear that, through a special partnership with the TSA, allows air travelers to register with them to bypass check-in lines at airports. As a Clear member, you pay $99 a year to have the right to go straight to a special Clear members-only check-in station at the airport, where your bags are scanned immediately and you can proceed straight through to the gate with no hour long waits to clear security.

Clear members are pre-screened before being able to join and provided with a biometric card, which is either a fancy way of saying “card” or it means that they employ some kind of fingerprint system, I’m not sure which. Regardless, this is an intriguing program to me. Post-9/11 air travel ranges from mediocre to impossibly horrible. In light of the hundreds of cancelled flights over Presidents’ Day weekend, JetBlue created a customer Bill of Rights and issued an apology letter from their CEO, which they emailed to all of their customers and posted on their website.

Considering that air travel does not appear to be getting any easier anytime soon, I think Clear sounds like a fantastic idea. At $100 a year, Clear is a relatively low-cost way to improve the hassles and expense of airport bureaucracy. Business travelers lose thousands of hours of productivity waiting in lines at airports. The ability to skip through those lines would seem to greatly improve that.

One thing that’s unclear about Clear is how effective it will be. Currently, they’re in just one terminal at JFK, as well as Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and Newark. The promise is that more are on the way, but I’m not sure how long that will take and I certainly wouldn’t join until at the very least they’re in an entire airport in NYC and not just one terminal. I’m not sure how many members they currently have, but presumably their membership is still pretty low. I also wonder what they are paying to the TSA and their employees to stay in business.

Then there’s the civil liberties question. Say that Clear works as it should and costs what they’re selling it for currently. What rights will we be giving up to take advantage of something like this? All Clear members have to provide fingerprints and pass background checks. Does the “biometric card” that Clear provides its members allow the government to track people? What else is Clear doing with their members’ data?

I’ll be interested to follow this one over the next few months/years. It could take awhile for this to catch on, and there’s the possiblity that there will be backlash similar to the way Russians have reacted to the rent-a-motorcade service that allows the wealthy to steer clear of traffic there. We’ll see what happens.

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