Posts Tagged ‘celebrities’

This Week in crazy

Wednesday, June 20th, 2007

Source: Photobucket

Two fun stories about crazy people today. In celebrity crazy, David Hasselhoff lost visitation privileges of his children “for two weeks after the public leak of a videotape showing an apparently drunken Hasselhoff struggling to eat a cheeseburger while on the floor of his Las Vegas home.”


And in sports crazy, Devil Rays rookie Elijah Dukes served up a
delightful pile of unrelenting nonsense crazy on a Tampa radio station. Among the gems:

“Ni’Shea Dukes, who you also called … featuring as a good wife and a stand-up type of person, is not so stand-up after all,” Dukes said. “First of all you need to get a little bit of her background. She was not born as a Paris Hilton or nothing like that to be trying to talk all proper. … You all need to go to the house and see what I’ve done for my kids. … If she wouldn’t have been trying to steal my money the whole time we’ve been trying to talk, we would probably still be together right now. Everything is about money.”

On Gilbert’s claim that Duke told her his mom had a crack problem, Dukes said: “First of all, I never said nothing about crack because I don’t know nothing about crack. … I never told anyone my mom smoked crack.”

On the alleged report that he impregnated a 17-year-old: “Me and her did something one time, and it was not even close to the time she conceived this baby. I know for a fact it’s not mine.”

Thanks to Danny for the tip on this one.

Longing for the days of Alex’s MVP and R&L Galleries

Wednesday, March 14th, 2007

Source: Flickr

I cleaned my room at my parents’ apartment this weekend (more on that in a future post), throwing away thousands of my baseball cards. Good ones, too, not just “commons.” Even 10 years ago, this would have been unfathomable to me, let alone 15 years ago, when my collection probably could have been sold to a dealer for at least a few thousand dollars. Now the market for the cards is a fraction of what it once was, and the few cards I chose to keep were those that I saved more for sentimentality than any value that they might have once possessed.

Mark McGwire’s once sought-after 1985 Topps rookie card (the ‘84 Olympic team card) is being listed on eBay for around $10. I was collecting baseball cards at exactly the time that their market reached unprecedented heights, and I remember when a PSA 10 of that McGwire card alone (and I had 2) could fetch upwards of $1,000. That card wasn’t even the gem of my collection. At one point, I had the ‘87 Classic Bo Jackson, the ‘83 Topps Traded Darryl Strawberry, and the ‘90 Leaf Frank Thomas. Actually, Danny had that one, and I wanted it so bad. I’ve got a ‘78 Eddie Murray, a ‘79 Ozzie Smith, and even an ‘89 Upper Deck Ken Griffey, Jr, the card that some say created the baseball card industry’s feeding frenzy of the early 1990’s. But man I wanted that Frank Thomas card.

There’s a legion of kids about my age who believed that they’d one day become price guide-authoring, pre-blogger-era media superstars like their hero, the inimitable Dr. James Beckett. We never learned what the Dr. was for anyway.

For those dorky enough to remember it all, here’s a trip down memory lane with some of my favorite cards:

The infamous 1988 Fleer Billy Ripken error card. Someone on the ‘88 Orioles team thought it would be funny to write “Fuck Face” at the bottom of Billy’s bat during picture day (it was). Billy had a fairly indistinguished 12-year career as a second baseball for some crappy teams in the the light hitting late 80’s-pre-power-surge era of steroid-free baseball, but the card’s popularity was increased by the fact that Billy is Cal’s little brother. Fleer pulled the card shortly after the error was discovered, but a few thousand were already out there. I pulled mine out of a rack pack sometime around 1991, an experience which, when prorated for my age and maturity at the time, ranks somewhere below seeing Beck in concert (really good) and above getting promoted at my first job (pretty decent) in the pantheon of my own memories. I am such a loser.

1987 Classic Bo Jackson, the “football/baseball” crossover rookie card. Classic cards weren’t even meant to be collectibles, they were part of a trivia board game that could be played with the cards, and ‘87 was the first of several Classic series. This wasn’t even really an official Bo Jackson rookie card, but because Classic made such a limited run in its first year, the card’s rarity drove its value way up during the “Bo Knows Bo” era. I got this card in 1989 when I was at Westchester Summer Day camp. We were brought into some building to play board games during a rainy day, and I found the original Classic board game buried underneath several editions of Chutes & Ladders. I also remember that I saw Rocky for the first time that day, followed immediately by Rocky II and, the next day, Rocky III and Rocky IV. Looking back on it, I think I just had a counselor who was really into Rocky.

1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey, Jr. card. If memory serves me right, this was card #1 in the set. Being card #1 was always a big deal, but it was particularly significant considering that this was Upper Deck’s very first set and Griffey was drafted straight out of Moeller high school and had not yet even played a day of pro ball (nor would he ever play in the minors). Upper Deck was the first company to include a hologram on their cards. And yeah, I’m writing all of this from memory. I don’t remember how I got this card, but clearly, I could have used some other hobbies when I was 9.

1981 Topps Harold Baines rookie card. I love this card. Despite the fact that the card is from the early ’80’s, everything says “70’s” about it to me, from the ugly ass colors, to the cheap design, to Baines’ amazing facial hair. I got this card when my uncle went to a tag sale and paid $3 to some guy for a binder filled with a bunch of cards from the 1980’s, including an entire page of nothing but Vince Coleman cards, and 6 Oddibe McDowells. What a sweet binder.


Darryl Strawberry ‘83 Topps Traded rookie card. I got the ‘83 Strawberry in that same binder that my uncle bought for three bucks. Topps Traded was always an awesome series because while the regular Topps set was issued in advance of the season (usually around spring training), the “traded” set would come out toward the end of the season and would include cards of the players who had been traded to new teams, as well as any hot rookies. Strawberry was the big winner in ‘83, Kevin Maas was the guy in ‘90. Kevin Maas was awesome.

Frank Thomas 1990 Leaf rookie. The 1990 Leaf series was the first that I can remember where a company that already had an existing brand (Donruss) issued a fancy, premium brand (Leaf) that collectors went nuts over. I was so jealous that Danny had this card. I think I still am.

Pete Rose is an idiot

Wednesday, March 14th, 2007
Pete Rose
Source: Flickr

According to this ESPN story, Pete Rose admitted not only that he bet on baseball, but also that he bet on the Reds to win every night. Appearing on the Dan Patrick/Keith Olbermann ESPN Radio show, he said that he hopes to be reinstated in baseball so that he can manage again. Says Rose, “[It's] all about dollars, Dan and Keith. If I was ever reinstated. If an owner don’t want to win and draw people, don’t call my number,” Rose said.

Pete Rose is a lying, cheating, greedy man. I’m not sure what book he’s promoting this time that he’s coming forward and coming clean, but I’m sure that he has some kind of ulterior motive in doing so. At least he could have the decency to do something really crazy to merit falling into that “wacky ex-athlete” category of celebs that we love or love to hate, like Mike Tyson and Charles Barkley.

Reasons to Watch Television

Thursday, March 8th, 2007

Source: VH1

I love reality television. Hell, I support reality television. Surreal Life Fame Games is a joy. Sure, watching it makes me feel a little bit worse about myself as a person and about how I choose to spend my time with my expensive education. But I also learned that I thankfully do not have the low self esteem of CeCe Deville, the rage of Vanilla Ice, or the complete bitchiness of Verne Troyer. Surreal Life Fame Games has taught me that minor celebrities have no sense of irony, unless they get naked for a living and apparently appeared on the cover of a Girls Gone Wild music collection. I know what you’re thinking… Joe Francis has a record label? Is it better than MusicSpace.com? (Answer: No. Nothing is better than Save the 90’s except maybe the newly released Monster Ballads Platinum Edition.

Tonight I watched the Surreal Life Fame Games celebrity phone bank challenge, where the B list cast was asked to call their B list friends and get them to call them back. Among the “stars” who called back… Frank Stallone. Joey Buttafuco. And big-time star, Carrot Top. No word on whether Carrot Top’s crazy muscles called back, too. Do you think you can book Ron Jeremy just to name drop people for an hour? Because I’d pay $12 for that.

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